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Music Teachers Belleville IL

Music teachers teach students music basics, piano lessons, guitar lessons, singing lessons, violin lessons, guitar lessons and more. See below to find local music teachers in Belleville that give access to instruction in music techniques, music composition, as well as advice and content on finding a music teacher who is a good fit.

Jared Cattoor
1128 Huffendick Ave.
Collinsville, IL
Instruments
Electric Bass, Guitar
Styles
Blues, Jazz, Rock - Alternative
Experience Levels
Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$34
Years of Experience
2 Years

Data Provided By:
Nicholas S.
(877) 231-8505
Big Bend Blvd
Saint Louis, MO
Subjects
Percussion, Music Performance, Piano, Drums, Music Recording
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
I specialize in instructing percussion methods, recording performance and live performance.
Education
East Central College - Percussion - 2004-2005 (not complete) Webster University - Jazz Performance - 2006-2008 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Jorge L.
(877) 231-8505
S. Kostner Ave.
Chicago, IL
Subjects
Percussion, Music Performance, Drums
Ages Taught
10 to 99
Specialties
I specialize in teaching Funk, R&B, Jazz, and Afro-Cuban/Brazilian styles. However I can teach most main stream styles, such as Alternative Rock, Country, Pop, and Hip Hop.
Education
Columbia College Chicago - Jazz Studies - Instrumental Performance - Percussion - Fall 2005- Fall 2009 (Bachelor's degree received) Roosevelt University Music Conservatory - Instrumental Performance - Classical Percussion - Fall 2004 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Luis Daniel B.
(877) 231-8505
n sheridan,
Chicago, IL
Subjects
Music Theory, Drums
Ages Taught
5 to 16
Specialties
Afro Caribbean, Rock
Education
Universidad Interamericana de Cupey - Drumset Performance - 08/12/06-05/15/08 (not complete) Columbia College Chicago - Music Composition - 9/8/08-06/21/10 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Annette Bjorling
721 Case St.
Evanston, IL
Instruments
Harp, Recorder, Theory, World Music
Styles
Classical, Jazz, Kids, Other, World
Experience Levels
Advanced, Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$55
Years of Experience
17 Years

Data Provided By:
Jeremy W.
(877) 231-8505
Sutherland Ave.
Saint Louis, MO
Subjects
Music Performance, Singing
Ages Taught
14 to 0
Specialties
I specialize in vowel placement teaching. a method that involves teaching voice through the idea that vowel placement begins in the throat, therefore causing a more focused open sound.
Education
Northside Methodist Academy - Academic - 1983-1997 (High School diploma received) Central Bible Colege - Church Music/ Vocal Performance - Aug 03-April 06 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
mike m.
(877) 231-8505
n fairfield
Chicago, IL
Subjects
Guitar
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
I specialize in an individualized lesson plan. Because I have learned many different styles of playing, i can cater to what the student wants to learn. If I am teaching a beginning student, patience is my key ingredient. We start with fundamentals and move forward. With a more mature student I typically work with them to advance themselves to the goals they already have for themselves .
Education
Hartford Art School - Painting - 01-05 (Bachelor's degree received)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Ian M.
(877) 231-8505
W. Grand Ave
Lake Villa, IL
Subjects
Classical Guitar, Guitar, Music Theory, Flamenco Guitar, Bass Guitar, Music Recording, Music Performance, Songwriting
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
Again, I am very confident in my teaching skills. I love so many genres of music that its hard to say where my best talents lie. But no matter what the style, I will say one thing that I have always been strict about is proper technique and rhythm. I feel like timing is something that a lot of musicians lack and often have to learn the hard way later on. I try to incorporate it soon after and onward after a beginner's first lessons.
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Tessa H.
(877) 231-8505
South Street
Dundee, IL
Subjects
Cello, Music Theory, Piano
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
I teach in a slower method so everyone can understand the instrument. If the student wants to go faster, I have no problem with that. I teach for mostly cello in the classical style, but can also teach in other different styles. When it comes to genres the sky is the limit.
Education
Elgin Community College - Music Education - 2007-2010 (Associate degree received)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Joseph L.
(877) 231-8505
W Northwest Highway
Palatine, IL
Subjects
Guitar, Drums, Percussion, Music Theory, Songwriting, Music Recording, Music Performance, Classical Guitar, Bass Guitar
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
I am pretty adaptive to any style, as I have interests that lie in many. As far as a specialty in genre, I would say those are rock, indie rock, reggae, and country.
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

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Finding The Right Teacher

By Chris Standring ( www.chrisstandring.com )

Finding a good teacher is not always easy, at any level. At the beginner level it is important to get on the right foot and as an intermediate player you need to know that your teacher really knows his or her stuff if you want to move forward. What it really comes down to is "Are you getting the right information?".

The big problem when it comes to music instruction is that it is not necessary to have any diplomas or awards in order to set up a teaching practice. Conversely, the best teacher may not have a degree in music, just a phenomenal talent for teaching.

The first thing to understand when finding a good teacher is that the best teachers are not necessarily the best players. And it certainly goes that great players are invariably not the best teachers, possibly because they are far too wrapped up in their own playing to be concerned about anyone else. OK, a generalization but a theory with legs.

So let's assume you are just starting out, an absolute beginner, so what do you do? Well, the first resource I would use is your own personal contacts. You may have a friend or cousin that also took lessons and he or she may be able to recommend someone. Music stores often provide instruction and you can also look in your local paper for private instructors. Even do a Google search. It's actually very easy to find a teacher, but can you count on them to feed you all the right information?

Let's assume you have a short list of teachers in you area. I think it is definitely in your interest to make sure that they are teaching simply because they love to teach. Not because they are waiting for their "big break". This is why I think it is important to find a professional teacher, not an aspiring pop star. So you might ask a series of questions:

  • How long have you been teaching?
  • What teaching qualifications do you have?
  • How many other students do you have?
  • Can you give me the phone numbers of two of your students?

This may seem harsh, but I just think it is so important to get the right person from the start. Why? because as a student you have no idea whether your potential teacher actually knows what they are talking about. So don't be shy to ask.

As an intermediate student you probably need to rely more on word of mouth to get the right teacher to take you forward. In your local neighborhood, especially if you have been playing a while, you are probably already hooked into who the teachers are so it may not be such a problem.

The other issue, aside from musical expertise, is that your teacher and you need to like each other. If you are to be successful studying together this is so important. I remember growing up that I would excel in the subjects where I actually liked my teacher. And of course I dreaded going to class with those teachers I did not like.

I am h...

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