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Jazz Classes Sun City AZ

Local resource for Jazz classes in Sun City. Includes detailed information on local music schools and music instructors that provide access to blues lessons, Jazz lessons, and instruction in Jazz music, Jazz improvisation, Jazz theory, Jazz chords, Jazz styles, and Jazz harmony, as well as advice and content on playing Jazz music.

Terry Smith
555 West Glendale Ave.
Phoenix, AZ
Instruments
Ear Training, Piano
Styles
Blues, Classical, Folk - Country - Bluegrass, Kids
Experience Levels
Advanced, Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$42
Years of Experience
9 Years

Data Provided By:
Vince J.
(877) 231-8505
N 44th Drive
Glendale, AZ
Subjects
Viola, Songwriting, Oboe, Opera Voice, Clarinet, Saxophone, Trumpet, Music Performance, Piano, Cello, Trombone, Violin, Percussion, Organ, Theatrical Broadway Singing, Guitar, Upright Bass, French Horn, Music Theory, Singing, Classical Guitar, Flute
Ages Taught
3 to 60
Specialties
I use methods commonly known where the students can recognize the pieces. I like to teach the students to create their own music. Besides teaching regular methods I like to supplement my teaching with songs that they like to play.
Education
Los Angeles State College - Music - 1/1963-7/1964 (Bachelor's degree received) California State University at Los Angeles - Music - 9/1964-7/1965 (Master's degree received)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Shannon Bost
4115 E Anderson Dr
Phoenix, AZ
Promotion
$40 / hr
Hours
Classical
Memberships and Certifications
Cello
Services
9 years

Ruth W.
(877) 231-8505
E North lane
Phoenix, AZ
Subjects
Cello
Ages Taught
1 to 99
Specialties
music, Cello Classical cello teaching
Education
Shadow Mountain High School - General - 2002-2006 Arizona State University - Cello Performance - 2006-present
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Patricia Fisher
5314 N 81 Place
Scottsdale, AZ
Instruments
Cello
Styles
Classical
Experience Levels
Advanced
Rate
$40
Years of Experience
30 Years

Data Provided By:
Autumn J.
(877) 231-8505
West Grandview Road
Peoria, AZ
Subjects
Music Theory, Piano
Ages Taught
5 to 99
Specialties
I think outside of the box and get creative with my teaching methods.
Education
Western Michigan University - Education - 2000-2005 Delta Community College - Liberal Arts - 1997-2000 Caro High School - General ED - 1994-1997
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Kenny E.
(877) 231-8505
W. Fallen Leaf Lane
Glendale, AZ
Subjects
Guitar, Songwriting, Music Theory
Ages Taught
6 to 99
Specialties
music, Guitar, Music Theory, songwriting blues, rock (mostly 70's), country, bluegrass
Education
Hawthorne High School - General - 9/1982- 6/1984 Grand Canyon University - Business/Management - 8/1997- 12/1998
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Nanette G.
(877) 231-8505
W Williams St
Tolleson, AZ
Subjects
Opera Voice, Piano, Singing
Ages Taught
1 to 99
Specialties
voice, opera voice, piano In piano I am partial to the John Thompson method. I also spend a portion of each lesson on scales and music theory. In voice, I specialize in bel canto. The most beautiful sounds come when you are not straining the voice. I work on getting it out of the throat and into the mask.
Education
Bullard high - college prep - sept 87-june 91 Brigham Young University - French and Spanish - Aug 91-April 98 WCC - music theory and performance - Sept 04-May 06
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Music & Arts
(602) 504-0206
Desert Glen Shopping Center, 5350 West Bell Road Suite 132
Glendale, AZ
 
Carolyn Broe
4972 E. Paradise Lane
Scottsdale, AZ
Instruments
Conducting, Musicology, Suzuki Method, Viola, Violin
Styles
Classical, Kids
Experience Levels
Advanced, Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$50
Years of Experience
35 Years

Data Provided By:
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Playing With Conviction

Playing With Conviction
By Chris Standring ( www.chrisstandring.com )

I'm very often disappointed when I go and hear straight-ahead jazz guitarists play in a club, no matter how good they may be. Many have practiced their technique and have a knowledge of harmony that is clearly impressive. They have good time and play well with the other band members. But 9 times out of 10 I am disappointed and for the most part I think I know why.

Most of these players spend countless hours in the bedroom practicing, working on stuff, perfecting things, analyzing chord changes, working on harmonic ideas and so on, something that no one recommends more highly than I, but it seems that so often these musicians lack the ability to communicate musically.

It actually reminds me a little of when I used to live in London and I'd be having a drink with a few horn players at the bar during an intermission (in the UK, horn players particularly from the north of England seem to enjoy a pint or two!) and I'd listen to them say how much they had no time at all for the 'punters' in the audience. With this attitude, those horn players put themselves on a pedestal, instantly separating themselves, drawing an imaginary line at the end of the stage. More like an electric fence! I never understood it, it was almost a way of justifying how little work they were prepared to do to really get their musical point across. What they said musically might have been very clever, even impressive, but whatever it was remained on the stage. No one in the audience was invited to experience that musical conversation. The audience was the last thing that mattered it seemed.

Now I'm not suggesting that we as artists entertain with tap dancing, plate spinning, telling jokes and so on, I'm talking about finding a way to connect with the audience, and the first step to doing this is through sound projection with our instrument. Don't forget, as instrumentalists we have to try that much harder to communicate with the listener because there is no vocalist to do that for us. We have to make sure our instrumental voice carries.

And I find, going back to my disappointment with so many jazz guitarists in clubs, that they simply are not concerned with that communication between themselves and the audience. I do not believe it has been an issue with most of them and I believe it is extremely important.

I am talking about playing with real conviction. So many players lack that strength, everything is quiet and timid and they seem like they are looking for the right notes, meandering away, somewhat apologetically. This does not translate to an audience, very often does not translate to other musicians. Too many hours in the bedroom practicing obsessively and not enough time in coffee shops talking to other human beings about THEIR lives! Musicians can be horribly insular and those completely obsessed with their instruments usually end up as the bigges...

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