Search Play Jazz Guitar.com

 

 




Bachelor's Degree in Music Derry NH

Local resource for Bachelor's degrees in music in Derry. Includes detailed information on local colleges and universities that provide access to classes in music performance, music education, music theory, composition, music history, and music technology, as well as advice and content on studying music and music careers.

University of Massachusetts Lowell
(978) 934-4552
883 Broadway Street
Lowell, MA
Tuition
Full-Time In-State Tuition Costs : $1454
Full-Time Non-Resident Tuition Costs : $8567
School Information
Type of Institution : University
Institutional Designation : Public—State

Data Provided By:
Ian Walsh
5B Upper Rd
Plaistow, NH
Instruments
Audio Recording, Composition, Ear Training, Electric Bass, Guitar, Other, Piano, Recording, Theory
Styles
Blues, Classical, Electronic, Folk - Country - Bluegrass, Jazz, Kids, Other, Rock - Alternative, World
Experience Levels
Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$30
Years of Experience
8 Years

Data Provided By:
Jean Antrim
50 Brookside Drive Apt I-4
Exeter, NH
Promotion
$50 / hr
Hours
Classical
Memberships and Certifications
"Flute
Services
Piccolo"
Service Types and Repair
60 years

Robert M.
(877) 231-8505
Water st.
Exeter, NH
Subjects
Banjo, Bass Guitar, Music Recording, Mandolin, Music Theory, Guitar, Songwriting, Violin, Classical Guitar, Ukulele
Ages Taught
6 to 99
Specialties
Rock, Pop, Blues, Country, Folk, Heavy Metal
Education
Winnacunnet - - 1988-1991 (High School diploma received) Hesser - Business mngmt - 1992 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Christine K.
(877) 231-8505
3rd Street
Amesbury, MA
Subjects
Music Theory, Piano
Ages Taught
3 to 99
Specialties
Teaching young beginners and elementary age children.
Education
Bishop Fenwick - - 09/99 - 06/03 (High School diploma received) Umass Lowell - Music Studies - 09/03 - 06/07 (Bachelor's degree received) Umass Lowell - Music Education - 09/07 - 12/07 (not complete)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Northern Essex Community College
(978) 556-3000
100 Elliott Street
Haverhill, MA

Data Provided By:
Chris O'Connell
19 Iris Way Haverhill Ma
Haverhill, MA
Instruments
Audio Recording, Composition, Drums, Electronic, Music Business, Music Therapy, Other, Recording
Styles
Blues, Electronic, Folk - Country - Bluegrass, Jazz, Kids, Other, Rock - Alternative, World
Experience Levels
Advanced, Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$45
Years of Experience
10 Years

Data Provided By:
Jean Antrim
20 Chestnut Street, N-31
Exeter, NH
Instruments
Flute, Piccolo
Styles
Classical
Experience Levels
Advanced, Beginner, Intermediate
Rate
$50
Years of Experience
60 Years

Data Provided By:
Rosalyn T.
(877) 231-8505
Wellman Avenue
North Chelmsford, MA
Subjects
Viola, Fiddle, Violin, Music Theory
Ages Taught
7 to 99
Specialties
My Teaching Philosophy is to create a warm, friendly and fun atmosphere for maximum exciting learning enviorement for the highest potential of creative learning. A combination of the use of positive re-enforcement and other tools to enable the student to have the desire to improve. Use of a combination of methodologies, as experience has proven the use of only one method is not effective for every student. Along with primary study of students' instrument, incorporation of theory, rhythm, 'rea…
Education
UMass, Lowell, College of Music, Lowell, MA - Music Education - 9/79 to 6/83 (Bachelor's degree received)
Membership Organizations
TakeLessons Music Teacher

Data Provided By:
Music & Arts
(603) 623-0153
Ted Herberts, 934 Elm St.
Manchester, NH
 
Data Provided By:

Inspiration Wanted - Apply Within!

Inspiration Wanted - Apply Within!
By Chris Standring ( www.chrisstandring.com )

One of the biggest stumbling blocks for music students is knowing what to practice. In the early years students listened to their teachers and did what they told them to do, which is still of course perfectly valid. But the real turning point that sets a student on their own path is the ability to self motivate and take the reins without the aid of a mentor.

This usually happens around the time that the student falls in love with music. When a student starts out, they usually practice out of fear. Fear that they might be told off because their teacher will scold them for NOT practicing. So much later, when the student has some basic playing facility behind them, music all of a sudden becomes fascinating to them. This is when the craving to pick up the instrument starts to happen.

As the student continues to explore on his or her own, there are doubtless times when road blocks appear. I've always thought that improving happens in peaks and plateaus, where the plateaus of seeming UN-improvement seem to last forever! This of course is never the case because the plateaus are the times when the information is being absorbed which is so necessary.

However, it is during these plateaus that the student often gets stuck. Personally, I have always got through these troublesome times because I have always paid close attention to a little inner voice that would always tap me on the shoulder and say "You know you have a weakness when you play over diminished chords", or "Your sight reading in the 8th position needs a little work when you play in the key of Ab". And so on.

This little voice never went away over the years. She's still there today, tapping me on the shoulder every few weeks, making sure I am not resting on my laurels. But I have found that if I am committed to improving and really open to working on whatever I need to work on, I will always get the advice I need.

I think deep down we all know what our strengths and weaknesses are as players at any level. Therefore as we continue to grow and develop as musicians, we must always pay very close attention to our weaknesses and work on them. They usually stare us in the face. The trouble is, it is very easy to ignore what is usually obvious to us.

One thing I have found is that, unless I am really open to learning and in the mode of wanting to improve, that little inner voice tends to go away. She's not tapping me on the shoulder telling me what I need to work on unless I really want to know.

So I guess what I am trying to say here is ask yourself questions! What is your real commitment to music and what are your weaknesses? If you truly want to be a great player then you simply need to focus on your weaknesses.

Now as time goes on, and you cover the playing field regarding technique, harmony and melodic vocabulary, then that inn...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Play Jazz Guitar